Monday, December 23, 2013

Chocolate - once I start, I can’t stop eating

I have a healthy relationship with food and I most of the times I eat healthy.

Healthy eating led me to the 91-pound weight loss and it continues to help with maintaining my current weight.  

Avoiding sugar is an important part of my eating strategy. Apples, blackberries, blueberries and raspberries are the only foods I eat that contain sugar.

Well, most of the time. I consequently avoid sugar except during holidays and special occasions.

I have to admit that I, experienced and successful dieter, struggle with chocolate. I therefore don't buy it or keep any in the house anymore. Except holidays.
Chocolate does something to my brain and just makes me want more and more. I have no control once I start. I can't just eat a piece of a chocolate bar and be done.

Despite what reason and intelligence tells me to do, I am unable to stop. When I start keep stuffing myself with chocolate to the point of discomfort.
What food can't you stop eating once you start?

Monday, December 16, 2013

Guest Post: If not now, when?

The biggest challenge people face when they are looking to improve their lives is getting started. Reading about self-improvement, or learning about the tools required to live a better life means nothing if you don’t utilize those tools.

One of the greatest causes for failure when it comes to personal development is simply a failure to act.
Listed here are a few reasons to act, they are posted to help you realize that the time is NOW; not tomorrow, not next week, and not after you have accomplished something else! So take a moment to read them and then move forward on your journey!

There is no change without action.
Sure, reading about personal development or positive living can make you feel good at the time, but without action the knowledge itself is somewhat useless. Your situation will stay the same unless you make the move to change it!

There is no one that can do it for you.
The harsh reality of life is that unless you make the choice to change you never will. No one, and nothing, can do it for you. If you want a better life it is you that has to create it. Period.

Lessons are best learned through actions.
When you make mistakes you learn lessons. Through actions you will learn what works and what doesn’t. There is no better way to learn that by doing, it can teach you things you wouldn’t learn any other way.

It makes you feel good.
Our self-esteem can have a huge impact on whether we take action towards our goals, but the best way to combat this issue is through action. It is somewhat of a double-edged sword in the sense that when you don’t act you feel bad, but you feel too bad to take action. Still, it is more likely that you will regret not doing something to change the situation. Taking action towards your goals makes you feel good. It raises your self-esteem, and it encourages you to move forward. It will make you happier overall and increase your confidence in a way that nothing else can measure up to.

Every small step counts.
Every small step you take brings you closer to your ultimate goal. If you make an effort to complete one action each day, even a tiny one, you are that much closer to accomplishing your bigger goal. Reward yourself for each small success as a way to encourage forward momentum. Keep track of each little accomplishment so you can see how they tie into the bigger picture.

If not now, when?
This is a common question asked by motivational speakers, and when it comes to personal development it is the question; one that you should be asking yourself every single day. If we wait for the ‘perfect’ time, a better time, later, we will be waiting forever. The truth is; if you keep waiting you are going to run out of time. Take a close look at what it is you are waiting for and find a way around it. Act now, or risk missing your chance.

It is about the journey.
Just as discussed above, every small step counts, that is because the process of personal development is more about the journey than it is the result. The ‘end’ of your journey to a happier more fulfilling life is something that cannot be expressed. In fact, an ‘end’ doesn’t really exist because living a happier life is a long-term commitment that requires regular maintenance and consistent actions on your part. Your ultimate goal will change as you do, and that is why you should be focused on the journey itself rather than the finish line.

One action leads to another. 
Each action you choose will lead to another action that will lead to another. You may look back a year from now and find that you are nowhere near where you originally planned to be, but your actions will take you in the direction you need to go by presenting you with opportunities and choices. These choices will lead to others and your journey will be adjusted to suit your growing needs. It may sound lame, but it is the truth, the hardest part of any journey is getting started, but once you begin, I guarantee doors will open for you.

Until Next Time…
Take Action!

Katherine D

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Katherine D writes a blog Inspired Every Moment that provides practical tips and useful advice for living a happier, more fulfilled life every day.

http://inspiredeverymoment.com/
 

Saturday, November 30, 2013

Try to stick to a healthy eating routine as best you can

Thanksgiving can be a stressful holiday. With so much delicious food tempting you, it's impossible to keep your healthy habits in check.

Thanksgiving is one of those holidays when people plan to eat until they are stuffed to the brim. What is worse, Thanksgiving often sets off a domino effect for the rest of the holiday season.

With so many holiday events revolving around food and cocktails, it's easy to add on the extra pounds between Thanksgiving and New Year's Day.

But that doesn't have to be the rule. Remember, Thanksgiving is one day. Done right, you won’t set yourself back too far!
A turkey-day feast isn't what typically causes the weight gain; it's the entire Thanksgiving weekend that often packs on a few stubborn pounds.
Yes, the scale is bound to go up the next morning, but if you get right back on the wagon on Friday morning, you can easily get back to your pre-Thanksgiving weight by the next week-end.

Friday, November 22, 2013

How I did it

Three years ago I developed very strong motivation that helped me implement drastic changes in my eating habits.

In May 2010 my weight was 261 pounds. During annual physical, the doctor told me that the test showed something in my heart. He told me that obesity was one of my risk factors and referred me to see cardiologist. The cardiologist recommended heart “procedure”.
The idea of surgery frightened me. I was determined to do anything humanly possible to lose weight. I gave up practically everything I liked. I adopted a diet that consisted only of fresh non-starchy vegetables, fresh low-sugar fruits, lean protein and a slice of whole grain bread. I took Omega 3 (healthy fats) and multivitamin supplement daily. I drank unsweetened hot tea three times a day and tried to drink a lot of water.

Changing my eating habits was not super easy and initially I experienced some level of stress after I gave up all of the foods I liked. The first few days were most challenging. I felt weak and had no energy, but I didn’t feel hungry. Since my new way of eating provided rapid weight loss at the start, I had the additional incentive to keep going. When I saw the numbers on the scale going down every single day, I got excited and wanted to stick with my method. Soon cravings for junk food disappeared and I honestly could say that I liked and enjoyed healthy foods I eat.
During my weight loss process I tried to learn as much as possible about losing weight, different diets, and challenges faced while attempting to lose weight. I read more than many books, hundreds of articles and reports, and extensively researched the weight loss related issues on Internet. I learned a lot about physiology, nutrition, health and exercise science, and perhaps I know more about losing weight than an average person. I know what my body needs for successful weight loss and good health, and I use this knowledge to continue to be successful.

I found out that by eating the new, healthy way I didn’t have to endure hunger to lose weight. I believe that feeling full and satisfied while eating nutritious foods was a critical part of my eating plan. The food choices I made helped me feel full with fewer calories and assured that I didn’t feel hungry.
Also learned that weight loss can be achieved without exercise. Shortly after I started losing weight I injured my knee and had surgery. Exercise was out of question, but I continued with eating habits changes that I implemented. The scale continued to show lower numbers at the unchanged rate. I could not exercise for 12 months, but kept losing weight.

I researched this issue and found out that what was happening to me was nothing unusual. Being active and exercise is great for our health but in terms of pounds, exercise contributes a little towards weight loss. Food is the component that largely determines whether we are gaining or losing weight, and the key to losing weight is focusing on eating of the foods that promote weight loss.
After I lost 91 pounds I determined to make this a lifestyle and not to return to my old ways. Since a healthy lifestyle is a process, I knew that to keep the weight off my new behaviors needed to continue.

Once I reached my goal weight, I was determined to make this a lifestyle and not to return to my old ways. I knew that to keep the weight off my new behaviors needed to continue. I have my weak moments, too. I allow myself to eat differently during joyful situations like holidays, birthdays and other celebrations - beautiful moments themselves, but at the same time, create opportunities to deviate from my healthy behaviors and eating habits. These are choice based behaviors and I believe I could have made different choices had I wanted to.  Unfortunately I also have moments when I am unable to control my choices. I sometimes experience binge eating.  I still frequently forget about drinking enough water.
Today I am no longer overweight and I maintain the weight of 170lb. I’m so positive about almost all aspects of my life and I became an advocate for idea that it is possible to lose weight, no matter what your life, your current situation looks like. If you can change what you eat and how you eat it, you will be able to lose weight.

I am someone just like you. I am no different than you when it comes to losing weight. I don’t have more willpower than you do. I don’t lose weight more easily than you do. Since I lost a significant amount of weight and kept it off, I believe I am in the position to be able to offer hope to others.
No single approach, formula, or plan for weight loss can work perfectly for every person. Losing weight is about finding what works for you and choices that make you feel good both physically and emotionally that you can stick with. When you know what works, then it is just a matter of commitment on following through each week on your best actions, adopting it to your unique circumstances and lifestyle until they become second nature.

To set yourself up for success you need to decide what is more important to you. When you are convinced that losing weight is more important than what you are giving up, then you are ready for action and you will likely succeed.
If you want to learn what worked for me please visit: ilostweightyoucantoo.com

Friday, November 15, 2013

The key is consistency

I found the precise formula that takes care of my weight in the best way possible for me. My approach is based on healthy foods and a few simple strategies.

The key is consistency. Almost every day I eat well, in a way that allows me to maintain a healthy weight. And when I fail to make proper nutrition choices, I just get back on my eating program the next day.
I am following what can be called 90/10 rule of weight management. I maintain healthy eating habits and activity at least 90 percent the time.
I mentioned 90/10 or when I travel it’s probably 80/20, because I lost weight already, and eating real food and staying away from processed food is a part of my lifestyle since my transformation. However, if you want to achieve weight loss, and especially, if you want to lose weight fast, the closer to 100 percent you get the better your chances of losing weight.
 
Achieving weight loss does not require magic formula or secret ingredients. Your body knows how to lose weight. It’s simply focusing on what works versus what doesn’t work.  It’s a matter of trying out approaches, observing your body’s responses, and monitoring how you feel until you find an approach that works.

Than you tweak it so it that it fits you. When you know what works, then it’s your choice and commitment on following through each week on your best actions, until they become second nature.
If interested in what works for me please visit ilostweightyoucantoo.com and click on the Eat like Me link on that page.

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Guest Post: Never Giving Up

5 years ago, I hit rock bottom.  I was fat, miserable, depressed, and sick. I just didn’t care about myself.  Today, I'm still fat but I'm not miserable, depressed or sick any more.  I finally broke free of the vicious cycle I was in.

3 years ago, I started to teach myself how to eat.  Seriously.  I thought I would be even happier if I was skinny. I learned about counting calories and understanding that you must expend more calories than you take in to lose weight.  I found there are two ways to reduce your calorie intake.
Artificially, by eating reduced calorie processed foods or by eating naturally low calorie foods such as fruits and veggies.  Not wanting to give up the things I love, I started out with reduced calorie versions of all those yummy things.  They turned out not so yummy.  Did I lose some weight?  Yup.  But then I discovered I got more bang for my buck eating naturally low calorie foods.  Even better, I discovered that I felt better, both mentally and physically, when I ate unprocessed foods.

Five years later, it’s 2013.  I feel pretty darn good.  Many of my previous health problems are non-existent.  Have I lost weight? About 55 pounds and counting.  But on this journey, I discovered a few things I wasn’t expecting…
•Skinny does not equal healthy.

•Healthy food does not equal low fat, low calorie

•There are lots of weird, scary things in processed food

•When I feel good, I actually enjoy physical activity

•My taste buds are trainable

•When I feel good about myself I don’t care what other people think about me

I still struggle every day.  2013 has been particularly difficult for me as I try to deal with some digestive issues since getting a stomach virus over 6 months ago.  I haven't lost any weight. There are points where I want to give up and go back to my old ways.  Trying to be as healthy as possible can be exhausting at times.  Sometimes I wish I could hit up the closest fast food restaurant rather than spending an hour in the kitchen cooking a meal. However, I know I can't quit.  Quitting means returning to the life I left behind.  Quitting means getting sick again. Quitting means being miserable.  I won't go back.
There are so many ups and downs when you take the first steps to getting healthy.  In the end, the ups are WAY better than the downs.  I may take a few steps backwards every once in a while but I will always make sure I have more steps forward in this journey.

Mandy


 

Sunday, November 3, 2013

Weight is an issue for almost everyone

Weight is an issue for almost everyone. If you are reading this blog, you are probably overweight. And most likely you have already tried to do something about. If you still trying, because you haven’t had much success I want to tell you that being in control of your foods choices is the “secret” to weight loss.  

It is always your choice. You can chose the type of foods you eat. And you can make some better choices. Achieving weight loss does not require magic formulas or specially purchased ingredients. It is focusing on what works versus what does not work.

If you are serious about wanting to lose weight, then it is absolutely essential that you provide your body with the best fuel possible. Your body knows how to lose weight; it is just a matter of trying out approaches, observing your body’s responses, and monitoring how you feel.
When you know what works, then it is just a matter of commitment on following through each week on your best actions, until they become second nature.

Sunday, October 27, 2013

Defeat negative thinking


I know that negative thoughts are part of our life no matter whether we want it or not. Life is a little bit more complicated than just being happy and positive. Negative thoughts are normal — everyone has them, but, left unchecked, your mind may pull you into a self-amplified process.
The danger with negative thoughts is that the more you have them, the more they stick around. Our negative thinking leads to inaction, which leads to no results, which confirms and reinforces the negative thinking.
You can redirect the energy you spend on negative thoughts into planning and setting goals for yourself. Rather than telling yourself “I can never give up the foods I love” turn those thoughts into something positive instead. Think about how losing weight will contribute towards something you desire or help you experience life better. Instead of thinking, “I don’t have the discipline or the willpower” or “I tried that and it hasn’t worked”, redirect that energy into planning something positive and put that energy into taking action. When you take daily action, you’ll find that things more often go your way.
It can also be helpful to remember that thoughts are different than facts. Just because you have a thought about something doesn’t mean it is automatically true.
This may sound like a small step, but it opens up big possibilities. It introduces the potential for success, which can help keep us motivated to continue trying. In the future all things are possible. Where is it written that this is impossible? Others have made these changes. Why can’t we? Sure it will take work, but that doesn’t mean we won’t be able to eventually.

Saturday, October 12, 2013

Guest Post: Finding Your ‘Why’

There are countless factors in play when it comes to how we eat. Making a change to diet or lifestyle can be daunting; so much so, in fact, that most of us elect to remain inactive, opting for ease and familiarity rather than challenge or change.

For many, the desire to make a change is rooted in “what things will be like” on the other side. Inaction is the paralyzing fear that the sacrifice, the work, the effort won’t be worth it. That we will fail, or worse, miss out on something good — and that won’t be worth it either.
If these worries are holding you back, consider instead the impact of making this change across our entire life. What will making this change mean for you? What will you gain from it?

Do you want to lose 10 pounds? Do you want more energy? Do you want to prevent disease? Do you want to be able to run up the stairs or pick up your kids or finally rid yourself of digestive upset? You can. You just need that ONE CLEAR REASON in mind to push you forward. What will that change mean for you? What will it add to your life? Moments of envy, frustration, doubt, or desire will be far more bearable when we have a big-picture motivator to keep us moving in the direction we intend.

In my practice, I work a great deal with people looking to overcome emotional eating and rebuild their relationship with food. Changing food habits means we need to get in touch with why we eat the way we do. This means considering why we associate certain foods with certain situations, looking at the connection between food and mood, and tuning into the signals our bodies provide. It can be overwhelming. There is a lot of information there, both physically and emotionally. When we start to look closely at our choices – really give ourselves space to think about why we make the ones we do – we begin to find opportunities hidden in our patterns that will permit us to break through. The key is taking a step off the ledge, acknowledging that we wish to make a change, and choosing to actively do so.
Keeping that goal in the forefront provides constant motivation and a rubric against which we can assess our choices: is this in line with where I want to go and who I want to be? Will this choice guide me closer to that goal? Know that you can make any change you want to, and that your reasons for doing so are valid, strong, and impactful.

If you’re looking for a clear place to start, these five ideas may help to stay motivated when it comes to making changes to your food patterns:
- identify your trigger foods: these are the things you can’t turn down and the ones that usually leave you feeling less than great. Start to make the connection between mind, body, and food.

- find substitutions you enjoy: the more good stuff there is in your diet – and your life in general – the less room there is for the more undesirable stuff. ‘Crowd out’ foods that don’t fuel your body with a variety of ones that do (and ones you enjoy).
- keep your big picture goal in mind: post it somewhere you will see it often (perhaps the wallpaper on your smartphone)

- don’t deprive yourself: when you choose to partake in a treat, allow yourself to enjoy it fully.
Guilt only exacerbates feelings of deprivation – and that’s not what we’re after! Flexibility and balance will serve you far more effectively.

- surround yourself with people and situations that support you: again, ‘crowd out’ negativity with as much positive energy as you can find. How do these interactions nourish you in ways food cannot?
- be open to new things: embrace adventure and exploration with your food.

- remember that there is not one diet that works for everyone: be open to tapping into your body’s intuition. It will tell you what it needs.
Every action begins with two decisions: the decision to act, and the decision to act in a specific way. Set that big-picture intention, keep it in mind, and let it guide the decisions you make. Then let things unfold as they will and revel in how great you feel for doing it.

Guest post provided by Amy Height.
Amy is a Holistic Health Coach and founder of From the Ground Up Wellness. She works with individuals and families looking to reestablish their relationship with food and build a strong foundation of lasting, healthy habits. She specializes in plant-based nutrition, weight loss, nutrition for children and young families, and managing food intolerances.

A graduate of the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, Amy combines a breadth of nutritional training – and the concept of ‘food as fuel’ - with her own weight loss and fitness journey to provide motivation and resources to empower personal transformation.
She is certified by the American Association for Drugless Practitioners.

Try out a ten-day plant-based eating plan. www.fromthegroundupwellness.com

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Make eating apples part of your routine

Whole apples are convenient snack. The fruit is low in calories. A medium-size apple has only 80 calories. Apples keep you hydrated: 84 percent of an apple’s content is water. This means apples not only satisfy your hunger but can satisfy your thirst as well.

Apples have long been associated with a healthful diet. Fresh apples are high in fiber and immune-boosting Vitamin C. Vitamin C is important for the growth and repair of all body tissues. Vitamin C also helps to heal cuts and wounds and keeps teeth and gums healthy.
When I eat apples, I keep the skin on. Eating whole apples with the skin is the most nutritious way to enjoy the fruit. A significant amount of the nutrients and beneficial compounds in apples are located just under the peel.

Apples are loaded with the powerful antioxidant, but is found predominantly in the skin. It has anti-inflammatory and heart-protecting qualities, and may reduce the growth and spread of cancer cells. Google “quercetin” to find out more. In addition, most of the fiber in apples comes from the skin and the pulp. When you remove the skin, you remove about half the fiber.


Apples are good for you. Numerous studies confirmed that apples have disease-fighting nutrients. Make eating apples part of your routine.  Be cool and bring apples to the office. After a few days you are likely to notice that you’re not the only one.

Saturday, September 28, 2013

It is never too late to become a better you

If you are like most human beings, you may be stuck in one or more areas of your life or career and want to change. Perhaps to lose weight, eat healthy, become a better parent, or a better, more effective leader? In one word - a better you.

Achieving your change can be difficult, but not impossible. It is so often that initial first step that is so hard to make. We think of a millions reasons not to take it and then look back on a life filled with missed opportunities to grow, learn and become a better person.

It is critical to know what truly motivates you to change. Keeping in your mind a concrete reason will have a tremendous impact as you proceed with your efforts. Focus on the reasons why you want to change.

Motivate yourself daily because every day we make dozens of small choices that determine whether we will succeed. Like everything in life, you will need to commit to it, work hard and be consistent.
It is easier to stay motivated and stick to your intention to change when you see your progress. So, make a small change if that is what is possible. From that small change and success you will gain confidence and you can build upon that to make more and perhaps even bigger changes.

There is always room for improvement. Learn from both your successes and your failures, and then adjust. Eventually you will discover the right combination of tactics to help you achieve your desired change. It isn’t too late for you to improve something in your life that you really want to change. No matter what age you are at.
When it comes to our future success, there are two ways to look at life. We can feel powerless. We believe life just happens to us. It is out of our hands, so we sit back, play the role of the victim and react to everything. Or, we can feel powerful. We believe our choices make a difference in what happens to us. We chose to act rather than react to people and situations. Which one describes you?

Some things in life we can change; some things we can't. Losing weight, eating healthy, trying to become a better parent, are definitely goals that are within our reach. Make an effort to become a better you.

Sunday, September 15, 2013

Eating healthy while away from home can be tough

Last week I travelled and worked away from home. This trip offered me an opportunity to meet and work with some truly amazing people.

For several days I enjoyed working with enthusiastic people who are passionate about their work. Their positive attitude and their enthusiasm for what they do was contagious and contributed towards successful completion of the project my team was working on.


Working away from home made eating healthy challenging for me. Limited time, not knowing where to buy healthy food, and eating between meetings prompted me to make hasty, unhealthy food decisions.

While healthy eating can be challenging when we are away from home, we can make efforts to make it less unhealthy. Here is what I did.

My hotel offered free breakfast, and the menu listed typical American breakfast food. I asked for apples and tomatoes, and they brought fruits and veggies that I requested. That helped me add some healthy elements to my breakfasts there. Another positive example was that the day after I asked at the front desk, where I could buy apples (my favorite snacks), free apples appeared on the table near the front desk.

Healthy food options were very limited in the area where I was during lunch and dinner times as well, and my choices were not perfect. I ended up with buying food for lunch in three different locations and creating my own menus. 
I was not the only one in my group that experienced the lack of healthy food choices challenge. One of my coworkers had to come back to the hotel and take some medicine to recover from stomach pain caused by unhealthy food she ate.

On the positive note I was happy that there were plenty of places that offered my favored coffee. I was in Seattle.

Monday, September 2, 2013

“No hunger” is the key


Hunger is the biggest pothole on the road of successful weight loss. The importance of no hunger in your weight loss strategy cannot be overstated. Allowing yourself to get to the point of feeling hungry will not help you lose weight. It is hard not to eat when you get hungry. It goes against human nature.

When you get hungry, you tend to want to eat more. The feeling of an empty stomach is very difficult, if not impossible, to tolerate and at some point you give in. Hunger is the most significant problem with weight loss and a diet that results in hunger will never be successful.

Snacking on healthy foods every few hours helps you avoid hunger and the associated  overeating. Apples work perfectly for me.

Diet programs that encourage you to eat smaller portions of the same foods you have been eating, rather than shift your eating entirely to a new regimen will not be successful, either. Reducing your portions to the point that you feel hungry at the end of a meal will not work. It is hard to force yourself to eat less.
But it's possible to choose what you eat. The answer to weight loss challenge lies in shifting your attention to the types of food you should be eating, rather than just counting calories or eating smaller portions of the foods you have been eating.

I really think anyone can lose weight without feeling hungry. You just have to eat the right foods. Automate your meal choices to create routines that make it easy to eat the right food.

I changed the types of food I ate and I lost weight. It took a bit of focus in the beginning to do it, but after a while, it became a natural way of eating.

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Guest Post: Drink Water, Not Sugar

You’ve probably heard that one 12-ounce soda has about 150 calories and 10 teaspoons of sugar. But did you know that juice can have even more sugar than soda?

Drinking sugared soda, fruit drinks, and juice can add up quickly. It’s easy to consume several hundred calories a day without realizing it. Research suggests that people who drink soda or other sugary beverages on a regular basis are more likely to gain weight than those who don’t, and that switching from these to water or unsweetened drinks can reduce weight.
Without a doubt, drinking water is one of the best ways to stay hydrated and manage your weight. It’s thirst quenching and calorie free. So, drink up! And to determine your individual fluid requirement, divide your body weight in half – that’s approximately how many ounces you need daily. For example, a person who weighs 180 pounds needs about 90 ounces of fluid per day. Please share in the comment section below. Your ideas could be very helpful to other readers.
Guest post provided by Lorraine Matthews-Antosiewicz, MS RD.
Lorraine is a food and nutrition expert specializing in weight management and digestive health. She is committed to empowering people through education, support, and inspiration to make real changes that lead to optimal health and lasting weight loss. Take her Free Self-Assessment and learn how you can lose 20 lb. – or more. Jump Start your weight loss today! http://njnutritionist.com/freeassessment

Friday, July 26, 2013

Rapid weight loss worked for me best

Many “experts” want you to believe that slow, gradual weight loss is easier to sustain than large, rapid weight loss.

What worked for me is opposite. I needed a solution that would provide the fewest calories possible while still providing all of the essential nutrients required by the body: protein, essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals.

I started to lose weight fast and fast results kept me motivated.  I got excited and wanted to stick with my method.  I had the incentive to keep going because  I saw the numbers on the scale going down every single day.

Clinical trials have found that people who jump-start their diets by dropping a lot of weight in the beginning had the best results in long-term studies.

Monday, July 8, 2013

Hot tea is beneficial for losing weight


I drink hot tea several times a day. No sugar, no milk, just plain, hot tea.  Hot tea is very beneficial for losing weight. It can give you a real boost.

Some hot teas actually reduce sugar and fat absorption while speeding up the digestive process.

Each time you sip hot tea, you get a huge infusion of powerful compounds called antioxidants which are believed to fight off heart attacks and cancer.
Drinking iced tea is not the same. A cup of hot tea contains more of antioxidants than iced tea. Chilling tea reduce the antioxidants. Iced tea drinks tend to have less actual tea and more other ingredients, such as flavorings which have no nutritional value in them.

Regular consumption of hot tea is associated with decreased weight whereas regular consumption of iced tea is not. Several cups of freshly brewed hot tea (minus the sugar) per day is the healthiest option.


After water, tea is the most commonly consumed beverage worldwide.

This website has more info on hot tea drinking benefits:

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/997.html

Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Life happens


Nobody is perfect.

Life happens.

At same point we are all going to struggle, we are all going to have a bad day and make some not-so-healthy choices.

It is called being human. It happens to all of us. The difference between success and failure is how you handle those bumps in the road.

Sunday, June 30, 2013

Maintenance is not a destination

Over the course of the past two years, I've learned a lot about myself and the strategies that are important for me to use to maintain my new weight.

Maintenance is not a destination. To me it's a continuation of a process of refinement of the habits that I developed to lose weight. Once I reached my goal weight, I was determined to make this a lifestyle and not to return to my old ways. I knew that to keep the weight off my new behaviors needed to continue.

Long-term maintenance of behaviors is something we can all achieve when we focus on the reasons that forced us to lose weight. For me focusing on my health was the catalyst that changed my whole perspective and allowed me to take a different look at my life.

I better understand now that my experiences both good and painful are here to help me grow and evolve. I continue to take personal responsibility for the decisions I make throughout my day. Sure they’re not always the best, but I've learned that it's okay not to be perfect.

Tracking was a very important weight loss tool for me and one that I've continued in maintenance. I continue to weigh myself daily.

Reportedly only 5% of dieters are able to lose weight and keep it off. Who knows the exact number, but it's a very small percentage. I’m sure, there are many more that lose weight initially, but keeping it off is a whole other story.

Thursday, June 13, 2013

You can lose weight


You can lose weight - but it's up to you to take the simple daily actions that will make losing weight a habit. You, and you alone, are responsible for what you eat. Quit eating unhealthy, fattening foods cold turkey or wean yourself off. Both work and are completely valid.
Choose what works better for you and start your own healthy habits today. Start making these changes now - this very moment. There is never a “best moment” to start losing weight. The best time is now.
Most people will just keep thinking about making changes. Thinking about change and talking about change don't make a difference. You need to get to the execution phrase. Action is what produces change.

Procrastination only leads to more excuses. If you take the first step today, you will have done the hardest thing that you will need to do - overcome inertia. Start losing weight now.

You can do it.

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

The difference between who you are and who you want to be is what you do



Food is the component that largely determines whether we are gaining or losing weight. The key to losing weight is focusing on eating of the foods that promote weight loss. Once you know the nutritional differences between processed and whole foods, you have a choice.
Every journey begins with a single step, but you will never finish if you don’t start. Once you make the first step everything else becomes easier; but it is important to make that step otherwise you cannot expect to finish something you did not start.
Make the first step today and start making these changes now. Stop waiting for the right time to start losing weight; it never comes. There is no reason you can't begin your weight loss journey right here, right now. No more excuses! Don't wait for the "right time". Do it now. Take advantage of the motivation you're feeling now and start making these changes now.
I learned that one should not wait to for a best movement to start losing weight. My experience is that there is never a “best moment” to start losing weight. Most people will just keep thinking about making changes. Thinking about change and talking about change doesn't make a difference. You need to get to the execution phrase. Action is what produces change.

The difference between who you are and who you want to be is what you do.

Saturday, May 25, 2013

Knowing that it’s possible



You must know that losing weight is possible!  Whenever you feel that it isn’t possible remind yourself that must lose weight because you want to live a happier and more fulfilling life.
It’s time to take control and accept responsibility for yourself, because you want to do more with your life than what you are currently doing.

The smartest people are lifelong students. Always learning from those around them, never believing that they know enough. Learn what you can actually do to adopt a healthy lifestyle.

Motivate yourself to find your own path. It’s about finding what works for you and choices that make you feel good both physically and emotionally that you can stick with. Keep learning what works for others and adopt what works for you.
Follow these principles and amazing things will happen. You have the power to change your life in many ways that you may not even realize. This is the beginning of the next phase of your life.

While weight loss can be challenging, it is achievable and many people are successful. I lost 91 pounds and you can do it, too.

Friday, May 24, 2013

It is never too late to reevaluate and change your lifestyle

Heart disease is the number one killer in the world, affecting more than six million people each year. heart disease has  developed into a lethal epidemic and the problem is set to continue since many people have unhealthy lifestyles. Expert agree that eating properly is one of the best ways to combat this.

Yet heart disease is potentially avoidable and preventable . If you want to beat heart disease, rethinking your lifestyle can help reduce many of the risk factors of heart disease such high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and being overweight.

If you already have heart disease, it's never too late to reevaluate your lifestyle, and there is overwhelming evidence that changing your eating habits can save your life.

I changed what I eat and it worked for me. For two years I have been eating healthy and I lost weight, lowered my cholesterol, and lowered blood pressure. I lowered blood pressure so much that I was able to discontinue blood pressure medication entirely.

I eat unlimited amount of fresh non-starchy vegetables, lots of fresh low-sugar fruits lean protein (lean turkey breast, skinless chicken breast, fish). whole grain bread, and healthy fats (daily Omega 3 supplement daily). I also take multivitamin supplement once a day. I drink hot tea (no milk, no sugar) three times a day and lots of water.

No single approach, formula, or plan for weight loss can work perfectly for every person. The eating method I describe below worked for me. I have lost weight, and most importantly, have kept it off.

You may want to look at what worked for me and then adopt it to your unique circumstances, lifestyle, likes and dislikes.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

It is hard not to eat when you get hungry


Hunger is the most significant problem with weight loss and a diet that results in hunger will never be successful. It is hard not to eat when you get hungry. It goes against human nature and you can only stand being hungry for so long.

The feeling of an empty stomach is very difficult, if not impossible, to tolerate and at some point you give in. When you get very hungry, you tend to want to eat more.


Feeling hungry the hardest part of losing weight. If your weight loss strategy involves going hungry, it is unsustainable.
You don’t have to go hungry in order to lose weight.  In order to feel full, you need to fill your stomach.  The key is in knowing which foods to fill it with.
Most people are satisfied by the amount (i.e. volume) of food they eat rather than the calories in said food.
I consume a low number of calories, but get all the fullness and satisfaction. Eating large amount of the right food to fill up my stomach and avoid feeling of hunger is my key to success.

Saturday, April 27, 2013

My healthy choice last night


Eating healthy while eating out is a big challenge for me. Last night I at the restaurant where people were eating steaks or hamburgers. It was difficult, but I was strong and ordered grilled chicken salad with balsamic dressing. The waiter didn’t even try to hide his reaction, after I requested no cheese and no croutons in the salad, but it didn’t matter to me.
I was trying to be consistent with healthy choices and managed to do so last night, but it is difficult. When you're trying to lose weight, dining out too often can make it difficult to stay on track. Restaurant meals are often full of empty calories that can quickly steer a weight loss plan off course. Here is the picture of my success.

 
 

Friday, April 12, 2013

Why only 5% of dieters achieve success


Over the course of the past two years, I've learned a lot about myself and the strategies that are important for me to use to maintain my new weight.
Maintenance is not a destination. To me it's a continuation of a process of refinement of the habits that I developed to lose weight. Once I reached my goal weight, I was determined to make this a lifestyle and not to return to my old ways. I knew that to keep the weight off my new behaviors needed to continue.

Long-term maintenance of behaviors is something we can all achieve when we focus the reasons that forced us to lose weight. For me focusing on my health was the catalyst that changed my whole perspective and allowed me to take a different look at my life.
I better understand now that my experiences both good and painful are here to help me grow and evolve. I continue to take personal responsibility for the decisions I make throughout my day.  Sure they’re not always the best but I've learned that it's okay not to be perfect.

Tracking was a very important weight loss tool for me and one that I've continued in maintenance. I continue to weigh myself daily.
Why is it that only 5% of dieters are able to lose weight and keep it off? Who knows the exact number, but it's a very small percentage. I’m sure, there are many more that lose weight initially, but keeping it off is a whole other story.